Text Size: A- A+ Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube

Breaking News

YouTube

SEARCH NEWS

Format: 04/16/2014
Format: 04/16/2014

News

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review: Pitt survey indicates spiritual wellness aids in cancer fight

Friday, July 10th, 2009

By Allison Heinrichs

Tribune-Review

Feeling angry with or abandoned by God increases depression in women with breast cancer, according to a survey by Pittsburgh doctors, which advises clinicians to ask patients questions about their religion and guide them to use spirituality to cope.

The yearlong survey of 284 patients explored the relationship between "religious coping" and well-being. The results, published in the Journal of Palliative Medicine, indicate that doctors should listen for "red flag" comments such as, "Why is God punishing me?"

"That's a sign for clinicians that these patients are feeling abandoned," said Dr. Randy Hebert, medical director of Forbes Hospice and lead author of the report.

Hebert and co-authors at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University found that most women with breast cancer draw strength from religion, though 15 percent of survey respondents reported feeling abandoned or angry, with more symptoms of depression.

"When someone is depressed, it's a cumulation of things," Hebert said. "If you're depressed because you have no money, that's hard to fix. If you're depressed because you have cancer, that's pretty hard to fix. ... But if you're depressed because you think God abandoned you, that's something we can do something about."

To read more, visit the Tribune-Review web site.

 

X
West Penn Allegheny Health System
Tell us who you are:

What areas do you use on our website?*
(select more than one if it applies)











Did you find what you were looking for?


Would you refer others to our website?

Can we contact you for future questions?

CAPTCHA math question:* 4 + 7 =

Thank you for completing the West Penn Allegheny Health System website survey.
We value your feedback and comments.